Alarming levels of pollutants contaminating Lebanon's beaches

According to the report, Ramlet al-Bayda, Manara, Dabayeh Marina, Antelias, Tripoli, and Qal'at Akkar are all polluted with heavy metals, solid wastes and other chemicals.
by Sally Farhat

19 June 2019 | 12:42

Source: by Annahar

  • by Sally Farhat
  • Source: Annahar
  • Last update: 19 June 2019 | 12:42

Workers clean a shore from garbage days after an extended storm battered the Mediterranean country, at the Zouq Mosbeh costal town, north of Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018.

BEIRUT: A number of Lebanese beaches are contaminated with heavy metals and toxic wastes, according to the latest National Council for Scientific Research (NCSR) report. 

"There are four major contaminated critical sites across the Lebanese coast," said Mouin Hamze, secretary-general of the National Council for Scientific Research, adding that eight sites in north Lebanon are polluted with solid waste.

According to the report, Ramlet al-Bayda, Manara, Dabayeh Marina, Antelias, Tripoli, and Qal'at Akkar are all polluted with heavy metals, solid wastes and other chemicals.

Other beaches are suitable for swimming and leisure activities across the country, however, located in North, South and Mount Lebanon, he said. 

"Compared to previous years, the situation has not significantly improved because of the lack of environmental initiatives."

He added that eight other sites in north Lebanon are polluted with solid waste.

According to the report, Ramlet al-Bayda, Manara, Dabayeh Marina, Antelias, Tripoli, and Qal'at Akkar are all polluted with heavy metals, solid wastes and other chemicals. 

"The results are unsatisfactory,” Minster of Environment Fadi Jreissati reported. “Our duty is to protect the citizens and warn them against the eight mentioned risky sites.”

Jreissati added that he will work with municipalities to ban the entrance into the polluted beaches, including Ramlet al-Bayda’s public beach.

The minister explained that sewage and solid wastes are the main causes of pollution. He blamed the government and the citizens equally and asked the Lebanese citizens to stop throwing waste randomly.

Meanwhile, the Minister of Tourism called on concerned parties to "assume responsibility," pointing out that the neighboring countries are also facing similar crises.

Following Guidanian, the Minister of Agriculture highlighted the interest of his ministry to improve fishing conditions to protect marine wildlife.

He pointed out that "Lebanon imports large quantities of fish, which is costly to the state.”

He also stated that "preventing the use of dynamite while fishing is the responsibility of the Lebanese army and not the Ministry of Agriculture."

Show Comments

An-Nahar is not responsible for the comments that users post below. We kindly ask you to keep this space a clean and respectful forum for discussion.