Qitar: An experimental train ride at Metro Al Madina

The audience was utterly engaged with the show, constantly moving along with the beats, and clapping enthusiastically at every chance they got, cheering Flugen on.
by Maria Sakr

13 September 2018 | 14:36

Source: by Annahar

  • by Maria Sakr
  • Source: Annahar
  • Last update: 13 September 2018 | 14:36

This photo shows Maya's father Georges Aghniadis as the mime. (Annahar Photo/Maria Sakr)

BEIRUT: Yet another magnificent musical event has taken place Wednesday night at Metro Al Madina in Hamra street, under the title of Qitar, which literally translates to train.

Composed and directed by Maya Aghniadis, who goes by the artistic pseudonym of Flugen, the show included a diverse group of talented artists of different focuses – be it singing, dancing, or playing an instrument – coming together and creating an hour and a half of a beautifully bizarre, experimental music masterpiece.

Aghniadis, who studied musical composition in France, has been breaking her way into the music scene in Beirut since 2014, and this show was nothing less of a testament to her multitalented self, as she excelled in playing the piano, the guitar, the synthesizer, and a number of wind percussions instruments, throughout the show.

Alex Abdallah dancing, Johnny Girges on guitar and Marie Caparros on Cello. (Annahar Photo/Maria Sakr)

“I started preparing for Qitar around June,” she said. “I literally called up a bunch of my artist friends, and we got together and created the concept,” she added. It truly felt like it; the show’s energy was very intimate, and very effortless, that it truly felt like the artists were a family having the most fun on stage, and creating a flawless show that is one of its kind.

“I’ve been dancing for 16 years,” said Alex Abdallah, one of the show’s dancers, “and never have I ever felt this comfort, happiness, and incredible energy in rehearsals or with the artists on stage. It’s amazing.”

Aghniadis ran the show — as she is also the one who composed it all but was accompanied by a guitarist and a cello player throughout almost the whole spectacle. Derived from the name, Qitar felt like a journey through emotions, life, and love, beautifully delivered by guests, some who came from European countries, ranging from musicians, dancers, and even a mime — who conveyed a heart-warming piece.

The music can be characterized as a fusion of world music themes, ranging from classical to electronic, flamenco and even some reggae, which was all blended with contemporary dance, and a small narration between every song, also written by Aghniadis.

Myriam Maatouk as a vocalist. (Annahar Photo/Maria Sakr)

The audience was utterly engaged with the show, constantly moving along with the beats, and clapping enthusiastically at every chance they got, cheering Flugen on.

By the end of the show, every single member of the audience was up on their feet, dancing to the final song of the show, clapping and singing along at Flugen’s performance.

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