Khayrallah Center seeks to promote Lebanon's cultural heritage

The centre initially focused on the Lebanese diaspora within the State of North Carolina, before expanding its efforts to different communities across the world.
by Annahar Staff

7 March 2018 | 12:37

Source: by Annahar

  • by Annahar Staff
  • Source: Annahar
  • Last update: 7 March 2018 | 12:37

This photo shows Dr. Charif Majdalani (left) standing with Dr. Moise Khayrallah (right) while he was receiving the Khayrallah prize for his novel 'Moving the Place' on March 6, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Khayrallah Center)

BEIRUT: The Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies is seeking to promote Lebanon's cultural heritage in the U.S, Latin America, Australia, and beyond, its founder Dr. Moise Khayrallah told Annahar. 

The centre, founded in 2014 and endowed in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at North Carolina State University, is dedicated to research on Lebanese immigrants in the U.S and throughout the world and aims to preserve and share that knowledge with the scholarly community and general public. 

"Our activities are wide-ranging," says Khayrallah, from hosting "exhibitions at museums to producing films that deal with Lebanon's culture." 

The centre initially focused on the Lebanese diaspora within the State of North Carolina, before expanding its efforts to different communities across the world. 

"Our director Dr. Akram Khater has been travelling to different countries to meet with Lebanese communities in order to promote our work and bolster our network," he says. 

To further enable individuals whose work captures the experiences of Lebanese immigrants, the centre also established the "Khayrallah prize", an annual award presented for the "best artistic expression of the experiences of the Lebanese Diaspora."

This year's award was granted to Dr. Charif Majdalani for his novel titled 'Moving the Palace.'

Khayrallah Center Director Dr. Akram Khater says 'Moving the Palace' stands out “because of its rich details and eloquence in exploring an unusual and unexplored part of the Lebanese diasporic experience

According to Khater, the novel stood out due to "its richness leavened with humour, and post-modern reminders that this is an imagined history."

Majdalani was honoured at a dinner in Beirut on Tuesday, March 6 where he received a monetary prize of 2500 dollars, after attending a public ceremony at the NC State University. 

Future participants are invited to submit their applications here



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