Children and parents in quarantine: A reinvented relationship

Parents, in particular, have had to readjust their daily schedules to cater to the needs of their children whose lives are now restricted by the imposed quarantine.
by Nessryn Khalaf

20 March 2020 | 15:33

Source: by Annahar

  • by Nessryn Khalaf
  • Source: Annahar
  • Last update: 20 March 2020 | 15:33

Picture shows children studying at home during the coronavirus lockdown. (AFP)

BEIRUT: The current coronavirus lockdown has forced people to restructure their lives to the core, with travels being postponed, schools and universities switching to online lessons, and entertainment venues temporarily shutting down.

Parents, in particular, have had to readjust their daily schedules to cater to the needs of their children whose lives are now restricted by the imposed quarantine.

Amal Mosbah, a dentist and mother of 3 noted that she’s been emphasizing the importance of her children’s mental health during this turbulent period.

“I make them listen to classical music in the morning and then proceed to coach them with their online schoolwork. We also play a lot of educational games together, but they’re always asking me when they’ll be able to go out again,” Mosbah noted.

She then explained that she uses animated videos on YouTube to explain to them how dangerous the pandemic is, and now they’re the ones who keep reminding her to wash her hands.

A father, whose 2 young daughters are asthmatic, told Annahar that not only is he and his wife working from home to protect their daughters from possible contamination, but they are also teaching them important skills.

“My wife and I have been teaching them how to bake, write poetry, read short stories, and even play the piano,” Malek Osseily expressed.

He added that he also spends his afternoons helping them with their homework and tutoring them subjects they’ve been finding difficult to grasp solely from the videos uploaded by their teachers.

As for Rima Kesserwan and her husband, they've been having trouble keeping their seven-year-old son indoors.

“It’s been hard to keep him happy indoors, but letting him play videogames after he finishes his homework has been the only thing that stops him from begging me to leave the house to play football,” she shared with Annahar.

And since he loves comic books, his father bought him 15 new ones to keep his mind occupied during the lockdown, and so far that has been an efficient tactic.

Jawdat Shamseddine, however, did not want to keep his boy locked up between 4 walls in Beirut, so he took his son to their village in the South as soon as the schools shut down.

“At least here we can go hiking together without spotting another human in sight, and I’ve been teaching him how to set up a fire, build a tent, and cook in the wilderness; one can even say we’re ready to survive a zombie apocalypse,” he noted jokingly.

With the population’s safety being prioritized, everyone is urged to stay indoors until the lockdown period is terminated, and one day, posterity will thank those who contributed to halting the spread of such a menacing virus.

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