Arts of the Lebanese Revolution build an open historic museum

Brushstrokes are taking refuge in what is presented on the streets, and breathing life into it through immortalizing it on canvasses, making the revolution a museum of painted history.
by Salma Yassine

20 November 2019 | 15:07

Source: by Annahar

  • by Salma Yassine
  • Source: Annahar
  • Last update: 20 November 2019 | 15:07

This photo shows Omar Sfeir's photograph, inspired by Magritte's surrealist painting "The Lovers."

BEIRUT: The Lebanese revolution is rendered a safe harbor for a crescendo of raw arts that revive the defiance within every hue.

A plethora of arts emanates from the Lebanese Revolution, with exuberance earnestly woven within the gravelly voices of the people, who are an indispensable essence to their unity.

“The revolutionary arts we are witnessing are endearing, given their creative, sarcastic, and emotional nature. They are a remedy to the Lebanese’s past traumas, the ones lingering within the charcoaled days of the civil war,” Nada Mouzannar, a singer and a member of the Lebanese diaspora, noted. 

The spectrum of arts encompasses various forms of paintings, graphic designs, music and written words, some of which are being transcribed on walls, and captured in snapshots.

Brushstrokes are taking refuge in what is presented on the streets, and breathing life into it through immortalizing it on canvasses, making the revolution a museum of painted history.

“The faces of the revolution inspire me, for they are art in their own sense. One could only drown in a sea of features; those of children on their fathers’ shoulders, young women, men selling flowers, the flags, the scarves, and the enormity of the architecture. Painting the revolution will eternalize it,” Reem Rashash Shaaban, a mixed media artist, told Annahar. 

Designs across Lebanese streets feature chants and slogans like “سلميّة، سلميّة – Peaceful, Peaceful,” “تحيّة للطّلّاب – Salutation to the Students,” and “الثّورة أنثى – The Revolution is Female” and reflect the crux of the revolution’s voice.

Musical creations are also blooming to iconize the revolution through streaming old songs known to be classics for every revolt, featuring the legendary “شيّد قصورك عالمزارع – Erect your Fortresses on our Farmland.” Protesters are also producing new chants and modern revolutionary songs that speak of the current state of the country.

“I felt that injustice entered people’s homes without permission, and we all had our own stories and sufferings to narrate. I went out to the streets and met artists with whom I decided to compose an anthem for the revolution,” Mahdi Mansour, a poet, noted for Annahar. 

A notable outcome of these melodic compositions was the birth of the “Revolution’s Anthem.”

“The prominence of having an anthem lies in directing the voices of the people towards a plethora of unified demands that are fuming with love, social justice, political reform, and the abandonment of sectarianism,” he added.

Omar Sfeir, a photographer, captured a still moment to represent the Lebanon that the revolution has birthed, by adding a twist to Magritte's surrealist painting, titled "The Lovers."

"My version portrays two people revolting under the name of love, regardless of their gender, religion, and sexual orientation. The kiss concealed with Lebanese flags is a token of defiance, wherein the cedar is complete by the two united lovers, just like my homeland’s people,” he told Annahar. 

Show Comments

An-Nahar is not responsible for the comments that users post below. We kindly ask you to keep this space a clean and respectful forum for discussion.