NAYA| RDFL: Be aware of women’s anger

"#Ihzaro_Ghadab_AlNisaa," which translates into be aware of women’s anger in English, demanded the government to adopt a civil law that guarantees equality among all Lebanese women and protects them from the injustices of religious courts.
by Sandra Abdelbaki

1 August 2019 | 14:42

Source: by Annahar

  • by Sandra Abdelbaki
  • Source: Annahar
  • Last update: 1 August 2019 | 14:42

Photo from RDFL's "#Ihzaro_Ghadab_AlNisaa" protest. (Annahar Photo).

BEIRUT: Following the violent altercation between Ghadir Al Moussawi, MP Nawaf Al Moussawi’s daughter, and her ex-husband over divorce and child custody issues, people took over social media platforms to share their views on the subject.

Ghadir's story, along with Rita's, Dolli's, Maysaa's, and Fatima's; serve as a daily reminder of the continuous discrimination that Lebanese women face when it comes to the personal status laws in Lebanon.

Accordingly, the Lebanese Democratic Women’s Gathering (RDFL), a secular non-governmental women organization, organized a protest against the discriminatory sectarian personal status laws in Beirut on Wednesday.

"#Ihzaro_Ghadab_AlNisaa," which translates into be aware of women’s anger in English, demanded the government to adopt a civil law that guarantees equality among all Lebanese women and protects them from the injustices of religious courts.

“No matter how much women are achieving, they are at the mercy of the religious courts at the end of the day,” said Myriam Sfeir from the Arab Institute for Women, who was participating in the protest. “The sects in Lebanon create disequilibrium among Lebanese women because each sect has its own way of controlling the personal status.”

Many prominent NGOs and organizations in Lebanon such as KAFA and Lihakki took part in this protest.

“We are in this protest because its aim is something that KAFA has always worked on and believed in,” said Warde Abu Daher, a case worker at KAFA.

Aside from participating institutions and NGOs, women who were victims of the unjust laws of religious courts came up to the stage to share their stories and voice their opinions to the public. 

Zena Bou Mohammad Noureddine, is one of many who voiced out her personal story. 

Her husband took away her son for three months and didn’t allow her to see him. Following a number of attempts, she succeeded in gaining back her son's custody without anyone’s consent.

“No one should challenge a mother and I’m not afraid of anyone,” Abu Mohammad Noureddine told Annahar. “I am a mother who will never give up on her son and wherever I’m going, I’m taking him with me.”

Other stories were shared through audio recordings. Banners, posters, and screams filled up the sky of Marty’s square during that afternoon.

“Not only are we here today to protest, but we also want to unite all women and women organizations to form an alliance against all the discriminatory laws,” said Zahraa Dirani, the media coordinator of RDFL. “We are here today to say that it’s time we say enough.”

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Welcome to “Naya,” the newest addition to Annahar’s coverage. This section aims at fortifying Lebanese women’s voices by highlighting their talents, challenges, innovations, and women’s empowerment. We will also be reporting on the world of work, family, style, health, and culture. Naya is devoted to women of all generations-Naya Editor, Sally Farhat: Sally.farhat@annahar.com.lb

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